Realistic Expectations

Most of the posts I have on this site are instructional, a collection of “how to’s” if you will.  I’d like to change gears a little with this post and make it mainly an informative one.  I’d like to talk a little about realistic expectations, or maybe unrealistic ones.  Many people get a dog and put very little thought into the decision.  They see a breed that looks cool or appeals to them in some way and that’s about as much thought that goes into the acquisition.  Continue reading

How To Handle Interdog Aggression

Interdog aggression is a very common problem that I am asked to help with.  I am speaking specifically about dogs that live in the same home, not the dog aggressive dog that wants to go after every other dog he sees who does not share the same address.  I have known people with multiple dogs that are never allowed to be around each.  This one’s in the garage, that one’s in the bedroom, and the other one is outside.  They all rotate places/positions through out the day, but they are never in the same place at the same time.  What a miserable way to live! Continue reading

How To Make Visits To Your Veterinarian Go Smoothly

 

Visits to your dogs’ veterinarian can be a difficult and stressful event for all involved.  Not only are they “difficult” for you dog, they are often terrifying as well.  Even the most laid back and mellowest of dogs can be stressed in a vets office, throw fear into the mix and you are dealing with a dog that literally fears for his safety and well being.  There are several things that can be done to help things go smoothly. Continue reading

How To Handle Fear and Fear Aggression in Dogs

When most people think of aggression, dominance aggression typically comes to mind, especially these days when some popular trainers feel as though every abnormal behavior is a result of a dogs struggle for dominance and “pack” status.  Fear aggression, however, is MUCH more common.  There are actually about 21 different forms of aggression.  Not all fearful or fearfully aggressive dogs bite, they may only growl or bark aggressively in situations that upset them.  These dogs generally react inappropriately when they sense an intrusion and worsen if they feel cornered. Continue reading